Growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement bring humans closer to becoming cyborgs

Our excitement with and rapid uptake of technology – and the growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement – are putting humans more firmly on the path to becoming cyborgs, according to evolution experts from the University of Adelaide.

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Growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement bring humans closer to becoming cyborgs

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TSRI study shows how specific gene mutation promotes growth of aggressive tumors

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have caught a cancer-causing mutation in the act. A new study shows how a gene mutation found in several human cancers, including leukemia, gliomas and melanoma, promotes the growth of aggressive tumors.

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TSRI study shows how specific gene mutation promotes growth of aggressive tumors

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CGT, CTM CRC collaborate to test patented scaffold technology for commercial scale cell expansion systems

The Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult and the CRC for Cell Therapy Manufacturing, the Australian centre for translation of cell therapy technologies, today announce a project to test at scale CTM CRC’s patented scaffold technology.

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CGT, CTM CRC collaborate to test patented scaffold technology for commercial scale cell expansion systems

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Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

We actually normally refer to this as whole-specimen imaging of breast tissue. What we mean is that when tissue is removed from the breast, which could be in the form of a lumpectomy – a breast-conserving surgery – or a mastectomy, the piece of tissue removed is relatively large.

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Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

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Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life.

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Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

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