Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

A UTI is an infection in any part of the urinary system, kidneys, bladder or urethra. They are more common in women and affect more than 3 million Americans per year. Many in the population will turn to sipping on a cranberry juice cocktail to alleviate their symptoms, but, according to a Texas A&M Health Science Center urologist, drinking cranberry juice to treat a UTI is little more than an old wives’ tale.

More here:
Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

Share

Elsevier releases new book on India’s health care reforms

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, recently announced the launch of Health Care Reforms in India: Making Up for the Lost Decade, an authoritative and incisive look at India’s healthcare system from the perspective of Rajendra Pratap Gupta, an expert healthcare observer as well as an influential and respected voice on public policy, innovation and the economy.

See the article here:
Elsevier releases new book on India’s health care reforms

Share

Hallucinogens may have therapeutic potential against intimate partner violence

Evidence in a study led by researchers at the University of British Columbia along with University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health Associate Professor Peter S. Hendricks, Ph.D., suggests hallucinogens such as psilocybin or LSD may have therapeutic potential for reducing intimate partner violence, or IPV.

More:
Hallucinogens may have therapeutic potential against intimate partner violence

Share

FDA clears Sangamo BioSciences’ SB-318 IND application for treatment of MPS I

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., the leader in therapeutic genome editing, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared the Company’s Investigational New Drug (IND) application for SB-318, a single treatment strategy intended to provide a life-long therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (MPS I).

More here:
FDA clears Sangamo BioSciences’ SB-318 IND application for treatment of MPS I

Share

Fortified dairy products increase serum vitamin D level in primary school children

Sufficient intake of fortified dairy products is of significant importance for the serum vitamin D level in primary school children, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Children who drink at least three glasses of milk per day had a higher serum vitamin D level than their peers who drink milk in lesser amounts.

More:
Fortified dairy products increase serum vitamin D level in primary school children

Share